Posts Tagged ‘customer buying process’

How to Research your Customers’ Buying Process

How to research the buying process of your customers and shorten the buying cycle

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Great example of simplicity

The cartoon on this page is one of the best on simplicity I’ve ever seen.

Cagle Blogs » Best Generic Speech Ever.

Why are some people and organizations incapable of simplicity and ease?

Why don’t some people and organizations simplify and easify their messages, products, directions, etc.?

I’m beginning to think that it’s not that they don’t want to, or don’t understand the value of simplicity and ease. I suspect that they might actually be incapable of simplifying!

Can people who understand the power of ease and simplicity, who devote large amounts of resources to these pursuits, actually be incapable of simple and easy product design, web site design, communication, structure, etc?

I’d like to raise some questions and share some musings.

I won’t bore you with the complexity, but I’ve just been sensitized to this issue in struggling to move my web site to another supplier that gives the site more speed and ease of use. I’m also switching from Drupal to WordPress and moving my mail to Google Apps Mail. So, I’m attempting to do three major switches that all have to be done at the same time. What’s important to you is that I’m learning some important life lessons and questions about Ease and Simplicity (EAS) that I thought I’d share.

You don’t have to know what they are, but WordPress and Drupal are programs for managing the content of web sites like this one. WordPress is a dream, written totally from the point of view of the user. They really understand ease and simplicity. Drupal gets the need for ease and simplicity, but they have been unable to implement it, even when they just spent years on a massive crusade to make it more user friendly.

It’s a fascinating mystery to me why some organizations like Microsoft and Drupal understand the need for ease and simplicity, but seem epistemologically unable to do it despite intense efforts. I’m not talking about the old Microsoft, which didn’t have a clue about simplicity. I’m talking about the present, hip Microsoft which desperately seems to want to simplify and make their products easier to use. There are Google, Apple and WordPress, sitting out there as outstanding examples of simplicity, dominating their markets, the most successful organizations on the planet, with everybody understanding that Ease and Simplicity (EAS) are major keys to their success, with everyone trying to emulate them, and no one able to.

Why can’t fabulous organizations, with amazing resources, copy the Ease and Simplicity that they know they need, that competitors have demonstrated are successful? It’s not that they don’t have the resources, attitudes, will, knowledge or desire. It’s not that it cannot be done: Adobe is a shining example (the only one I can think of at the moment) of a company that had hopelessly complicated products with the most capabilities in their fields. They have somehow gone to elegantly simple interfaces and explanations, while increasing the capabilities of their programs. Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Illustrator, and their other programs can hardly be considered simple and easy in the grand scheme of things. But they are masterpieces of EAS, given that they are professional programs designed to have more bells, whistles and other capabilities than their competitors. They also have simpler versions, like Photoshop Elements and Lightroom, that aren’t just stripped down, they are re-designed from the users’ point of view, for the non-professional in the case of Elements, and from the photographer rather than the graphic artist point of view, in the case of Lightroom. BRAVO!

You would think that Microsoft, Drupal, all the phone companies, HP, and many others, could do anything they set their minds to, given their resources. So what’s going on and what can we learn from it?

Here’s my thinking so far: I realize that the inability to easify and simplify is related to a particular kind of knowledge blindness, but it seems to go beyond just blindness.. Knowledge blindness (and its more extreme form, expert blindness) is the inability to see things the way a beginner or less-informed person sees it. But I think that something much more profound and deeper may be operating here. Maybe it’s not just the inability to see, but Ease and Simplicity demand that someone’s mind work differently: They have to engage in an alien process. instead of piling on more and more information and features, they have to see what can be simplified or eased for the other person, even though it’s easy and simple for them. Then, they have to simplify, which, it turns out, is a very difficult process. It doesn’t only involve leaving things out. It involves many things like abstracting out the details, re-sequencing things, organizing concepts into sub-concepts or higher-level categories, forming new concepts or groups, and many other psychological, communication, and product design skills. It’s a form of thinking that very smart people don’t have to do much, because they are so smart that they can hold so much in mind, and less intelligent people can’t do because it takes a lot of intelligence.

So, my working hypothesis is this: Easification and Simplification can only be done by very intelligent people who have mastered an additional complex skill set, much like some writers and editors have mastered the art of writing simply about complex subjects. No one — to my knowledge and I’ve searched a lot — has set out the methods of easification and simplicity. Hell, there isn’t even a word “easification” “easify” or, for that matter, “funification.” I plan to write about this skill set in much greater detail. Stay tuned.

How to exceed your projections in half the time

Contrary to popular belief, the better the product is, the harder it usually is to sell. The best products tend to be the innovative, breakthrough products – and the marketplace rarely beats a path to their door.

Why? Because innovative, breakthrough, high-tech products make most people uncomfortable.

That’s why they are called discontinuous or disruptive innovations.

There are invariably problems with:

  • communicating the benefits,
  • getting people to believe the claims,
  • getting people to do things a new way,
  • satisfying the vested interests,
  • overcoming natural inertia,
  • overcoming people’s discomfort with initial trial,
  • supporting their initial learning curve,
  • helping them “sell” their colleagues, etc.

New products increase people’s uncertainty, make them uncomfortable and increase their feelings of insecurity.

That’s why marketers seriously overestimate market share and underestimate the time that it will take to get there.

One VERY successful Marketing VP once advised, “Give them a number and give them a date. But never, ever in the same document.”

Yet, it is possible to dramatically reduce the time it takes for new products to be adopted. This is especially true for technical, high-tech, innovative, breakthrough products, where the decisions tend to be more deliberative and less impulsive than many consumer packaged goods decisions.

(For verbal convenience, I’ll call these high-tech products, but I’m including here technical, medical, business-to-business, marketing automation, agricultural, chemical, financial and similar products and services.) The following product acceleration methods do not apply as well to consumer packaged goods, particularly those that involve personal taste and depend heavily on product image.

But if you’re selling “high-tech products,” I sincerely believe that the ideas that you are about to read can make the difference between failure and wild, run-away success.

The key to accelerating product adoption

You’re trying to get your product adopted in the marketplace, fast. Obviously, that means that you are trying to get people to evaluate, choose, try, buy, implement and use your product. This means that you are trying to influence their decision process. The decision process is central to product acceptance and product success, yet it is almost totally neglected.

When you reduce the time it takes for customers to decide on your product and make it significantly less than your competition, you will dominate your marketplace.

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WOMworthy: the Pluot

Just ran across an inter­est­ing new prod­uct that is appar­ently catch­ing on by WOM: the Pluot®. It’s a cross (actu­aly an “inter­spe­cific,” which is more than just a blend) between a plum and an apri­cot and comes in many vari­eties. It tastes great, but our focus here is on inter­est­ing Word of Mouth stories.

To read an inter­est­ing WOM story about how the Pluot word of mouth is being trans­mit­ted by an expert and by ordi­nary peo­ple, see Emeril’s post about it here.

You can also read about the prod­uct from its devel­oper. Link. There, you’ll also read about another prod­uct, but I’ll let you dis­cover it for yourself.

Isn’t this a prod­uct that cries out for sam­pling and in-store tast­ing? Why haven’t I been offered a taste of this won­der­ful product?

Warn­ing: don’t just buy one to take home.

By the way, I go to a small Korean super­mar­ket (Orange Mar­ket in Orange­burg, NY) that will let me taste (actu­ally, they encour­age me to taste) any fruit that I’m think­ing of buying. Isn’t that the way to make the decision easy?

Lesson; Give them a taste. In showbiz, it’s called “Show ’em a little leg.”