“Make Customer Decisions Simple and Easy” – still the best marketing strategy

by George Silverman · 9 comments

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The most successful marketing strategy was summed up by Frank W. Woolworth more than 50 years ago:

"I'm the world's worst salesman.
Therefore, I must make it easy for people to buy."

With that marketing strategy, Woolworth built one of the largest companies in the history of the world.

Since then many others have used the same marketing strategy: make it simpler and easier to get, find, learn about, try, buy, use and evangelize.

It's still the best marketing strategy

"Simple and Easy to Buy" is still the key to marketing success. But exactly how do you make decisions easier for customers? That's what you will learn on this web site and in The Market Navigators' Briefings.

If you are not the leader in your field, you are not making it easy enough for people to buy. Your competitors are making it easier. It’s just that simple.

In your field, YOU will become the leader when you are the first in your industry to master The Easy Strategy.

The Easy Strategy: The company that makes the entire customer decision process easiest – every step of the way – WINS.

If you are not the leader in your field, you are not following The Easy Strategy. Your competitors are making it easier.

The best Marketing Strategy is just that simple — and easy.

Mnav.com is the world’s only website and newsletter dedicated to the idea that making it easier for the customer to say, “Yes” is the best marketing strategy.

Our mission is to supply the tools that can give EVERY marketing strategist who has a superior product, service or idea, the ability to get more customers, clients and sales by making the customer decision process easy.

Marketing strategy is misunderstood, even by marketers. Marketing is a noble profession, helping people make difficult decisions about products that can enhance their lives.

If you believe that...
    •    customers are friends who you exchange goods and services with (except that your friends didn’t help pay for your house),
    •    that your mission is to help these friends make the best, easiest decisions,
    •    that YOUR product is the best decision...

...you’ve come to the right place.

Please join us in our journey.

Fill out the following form and you will be well on your journey:



 

 

George Silverman
George Silverman, The Decision Guy
George Silverman, The Decision Guy "The Easiest-to-Decide-on product wins"

I’m George Silverman, The Decision Guy. My work is all about making your customers’ decisions easier. When you master making decisions easier, you will achieve massive business increases.

What do you need to make easier? Everything! Everything from finding your product, comparing it to other options, getting answers and information faster, understanding the perfection of your solution, solving problems, providing comfort with a good guarantee, warranty or track record, and creating an optimal customer experience that exceeds their expectations. – faster, easier and with less time and stress than your competition.

It is YOUR job to help your customers find and make the easiest decision – the best, most expedient solution to their problem.  Learn more about The Best Marketing Strategy

{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

Ron Richards June 23, 2011 at 6:35 pm

I find your insights unique, powerful, and clear. Why is such breakthrough knowhow offered free?

Reply

George Silverman June 24, 2011 at 1:18 am

Full disclosure: Ron is a close friend and former business partner. It’s a legitimate question, and I didn’t put him up to asking it. The question comes as a total surprise. So, instead of calling him up and answering it, I’m answering it in public.

Thanks. Free because I practice what I preach, making decisions easier. I want to get my know-how into as many people’s hands as easily as possible. By making the decision easy, people get exposed to my approach of making products more decision friendly. As marketers realize that the key to product success is easy decisions, the idea becomes more in demand. By reading my books and articles, they realize that I know more about the customer decision process than anybody. And they need my expertise to apply the knowledge. Because of knowledge blindness, they can’t apply decision easification to their own products as easily as I can. Why not buy my expertise? It’s much cheaper than spending years trying to apply it themselves. I make my living from consultations, training and from speeches. It’s like a recording artist. The smart ones encourage “piracy,” or give their music away — a form of “free-sample marketing.” They make much more money on concert tours. I make my money from the successful customized APPLICATION of my ideas, not from writing about the ideas themselves.
Also, it’s a screening device. I want to work with people who understand the power of my ideas. Not someone who wants to protect himself by working with a famous marketing consultant. That’s why my site is singularly lacking in bragging about fame as a marketer, no degrees, awards or credentials, not even client lists and accounts of my record-breaking sales increases. I just want to lay out the ideas in great depth. Anybody can use them and devote 10-30 years learning how to apply them fully in their situation. Or, they can hire me for a LOT less money, especially when they factor in the cost of lost opportunity.
Last, but not least, I have more fun applying my knowledge and watching the good guys win than I do selling e-books, although so-called “passive” income is also nice, so you you will see some publications, webinars and other stuff that isn’t offered for free. When people like you ask me why my knowhow is free it makes it all worthwhile because I know that people are seeing the value. Making the value glaringly obvious is part of the Decision Easification approach — probably the most personally gratifying part.

Reply

Gilliam June 28, 2011 at 2:52 am

My Question is how do I get the word out? I read the reviews for your book word of mouth marketing it seems to be geared towards big business.

How does a one man operation get the word out and make some decent money.
I provide Small Moving & Hauling Services. I primarily advertise on Google adwords <—-A BIG WASTE of MONEY< and I advertise for free on Craigslist in the services department. Sometime my ad does wonders I might get 5 customers in a day on a good day. But on a bad day I get the big goose egg NO CUSTOMERS. If your not to Busy I would like to talk to you I dont have much money for a consultation but I would be willing to work something out to see if you could bring me more success. My Telephone Number is … [Taking the liberty of removing his phone number for privacy reasons.]

Reply

George Silverman June 28, 2011 at 7:22 pm

Gilliam:

The 2nd edition of my book is geared to businesses of all sizes, including one-person operations.

Your questions are quite typical of the small business owner. First of all, your use of the phrase “get the word out” leads me to believe that you are probably making a very common mistake: most people lump together exposure and content. In other words, you can get exposed to people all over the place but what they are exposed to is just as important:

While it’s very difficult to comment on your situation without seeing your Google ad words ads and your Craigslist ads, several questions and suggestions occur to me. I assume that you have some competitors. You are not selling the idea of moving or hauling, i.e., you are not trying to get people to do these things. You are trying to get them to pick you to do it. So, how and why are you different, and why is that important to the customer? You might be the most responsive (able to move or haul this afternoon), the least expensive, the premium service [that takes the most care, uses the most packing, specializes in fragile items]. The mistake that almost all beginning marketers make, and many professional marketers make as well, is to try to be all things to all people. But it is obvious to all of your potential customers that you can’t provide premium service, such as larger crews, premium packaging, etc. and still be the lowest cost and/or most responsive. So the question is, what are you? What can you be? What do you want to be? What is the edge that you have, or could have, over your competition? Usually, you want to pick the biggest thing that people want, that you can be and where you can sustain a competitive advantage.

It isn’t easy to identify what your edge is. or should be. That’s what you have to be clear about first. Then, ask, “Is there a deeper truth that this is part of? What does this come from” So, for instance, I realized that while word of mouth is the most powerful force in the marketplace, more fundamental is that WOM makes decisions easier, in a variety of ways that are outlined in my book. So, I now concentrate on decision “easification,” with word of mouth one way to do this.

Another thought: I notice that you don’t have a web site. These days, you must. Don’t spend a lot of money. Find someone who can help you, and just put up one page for starters. Put up a picture, and write a heartfelt letter to your potential customers telling them why it’s in THEIR interest to do business with you (NOT why you’d like their business). Put in your address and phone number, and the geographical area you serve. Imagine yourself in their shoes and ask yourself, “What else could I put here that would make their decision to contact me easier?”

Reply

Wendy Keller June 29, 2011 at 2:22 pm

I’m a “middleman”. My real customers are the big companies who write the checks, but I also have to keep the vendors who give me what I sell. I want to spread the word-of-mouth to the big companies, but can’t figure out how to get inside these behemoths. Any advice?

Reply

George Silverman June 29, 2011 at 4:06 pm

Yes, a lot of advice. I’ve always found that people who find me are 1000% more receptive then when I approach them. You’ve got to find out what they’re looking for and be right there on the path to lend a helping hand. I’m reminded of the time that I was part of a group of much younger people climbing a mountain to the top of a volcano. At just the moment when I was so tired that I could not take another step, a young local boy, Jorge, sold me his service with one word. “Taxi!,” he called out from behind our group. Turns out, it was the only word of English that he knew, or needed to know. He had 2 horses in tow, which my wife and I promptly rented. While, technically he found me, I felt like I found him, at just the right moment. It is this principle is at the root of Google’s multibillion-dollar advertising business: Be at the right place, at the right time, when the customer is maximally receptive. You haven’t given me enough information about exactly who these companies are, or what they are looking for. But, you can bet that they are Googling all day long, reading e-mail, looking at and reading other media. Find out what path they are on, then stand in the middle of it and scream “Taxi!”

When you say that is the big companies that write the checks, what are they writing the checks for? Then, ask yourself what are they REALLY writing the checks for? What’s the deeper need? What were the decision blocks that slowed them down and almost caused them not to buy? Make those things easier.

Sorry, as they said in the Broadway musical, “The Book of Mormon,” “prophets always talk in metaphors and allegories.” If you get more specific, I’ll get much more specific.

Reply

Kiran November 8, 2011 at 8:24 pm

We are a young software company in Silicon Valley, getting ready to introduce our Internet service for family members to monitor and manage health at home using wireless personal health devices. Our immediate target market is the 30-to-50 year old generation, concerned about obesity and/or diabetes and perhaps worried about their senior parents’ health also. Our target segment is more apt to decide based on word-of-mouth referral rather than AdWords/Facebook ads and so on. Therefore we want to engage strongly in WOM marketing. Can you give us some suggestions ? I read the second edition of your book “Secrets of WOM Marketing”, particularly chapters 13+

Reply

George Silverman November 9, 2011 at 11:36 am

I agree that social networking is not as relevant to this middle-aged age group. I think your best bet is to give out a lot of free memberships to the press. Also, give away a lot of memberships to influential physicians who can recommend it to other physicians and their patients. Also, concentrate on health-oriented magazines and web sites. Optimize web pages for hits on monitoring parents. Obviously, free trials are a powerful weapon.

Also, start an advisory group, beta test group, etc., and keep in constant touch with your customers. Keep asking them to recommend the service to their friends, not as a favor to YOU, as a favor to THEIR FRIENDS.

Reply

Jeff Anderson September 16, 2013 at 8:47 pm

Thankyou George; I have already signed
up for your, ” Get the 10 simple yeses”
report. I am new to Internet Marketing
and I can see how your, make it easier
concepts would be a great benifit for
any marketer, based on all of my own
experience and observations with people.
Thankyou for Sharing !!

Reply

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